Grace for Every Race | The problem

Grace for Every Race | The problem

Over the next few posts, I'll be sharing some of the content from a sermon I recently preached at Sojourn Chattanooga on Acts 10 & 11. Grace For Every Race was a tough sermon.

Racism and discrimination have no place in the church

There is no continent exempt from the permeating history of racism and discrimination. Over the centuries discrimination has looked differently, some say that it no longer exists. We can all agree that the parasitic sin of discrimination is still at work.

On Thursday, The Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and Justice opened to the public in Montgomery, Alabama. Quoting the New York Times, “At the center is a grim cloister, a walkway of 800 weathered steel columns, all hanging from the roof.  Etched on each column is the name of an American county and the people who were lynched there, most listed by name, many simply as “unknown.”

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Though the Memorial is 250 miles away from Chattanooga, Hamilton County is one of the 800 hanging columns. Our beloved Walnut Street Bridge, a symbol of revitalization and recreation serves as a memorial, a silent memorial for many of the dark past of race-related lynching in Chattanooga. In an article in the Times Free Press, Dan Cook says, “In 1906, an innocent black man named Ed Johnson was terrorized, beaten, shot and lynched from the second span of the downtown side of the Walnut Street bridge. Thirteen years before, another black man, Alfred Blount, was lynched from the first. But if you walk, run or bike the Walnut Street bridge, as millions of people have, you won't see any mention of that.”

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Acts 10:1 - 11:18 deal directly with the topic of racism, discrimination, and also the transformation that the Spirit of God brings. Throughout this text we will see that God's grace is, indeed, for every race.

Chattanooga Fun!

Chattanooga Fun!

Grace for every race - the setting

Grace for every race - the setting